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November 2010

Executive Briefs: Identifying Future Semiconductor Growth Markets

Phoenix, Arizona November 30, 2010 - Semico Research has recently released 4 parts of our 33 part series called the Executive Briefs. These briefs include 4 data-rich pages filled with tables and figures including:

• Table: Forecast by Units, Revenues, and ASPs
• Table: Semiconductor Content
• Table: Geographic Production
• Figure: 2010 Semiconductor Content % of Total
• Figure: Semiconductor Dollar and Unit TAMs in Millions
• Figure: Quarterly Geographic Change
• Figure: Semiconductor Wafer Demand by Process Node

Semico Executive Brief: DVD Video Recorders

The DVD format is not dead. On the consumer side, the Americas are switching to Blu-ray, while Asia Pacific is still using standard DVD players. The WW market will reach ~110m units in 2014.

The Executive Briefs cycle through 33 markets per year. Our analysts look to the segments that account for >80% of semiconductors, meaning our list of markets is fluid; we’re constantly adding new high growth markets to the list.

Table of Contents: 

iPad vs. the Galaxy Tab. The Winner is… Something Else?

I’ve always been unlucky when it comes to notebooks. They never last more than a few years before their motherboard explodes, usually just a few days after the warranty expires. That’s why last year I decided to get a desktop instead. It has everything I’ll ever need (hopefully) in a computer:

  • Intel i5 CPU
  • 8 GB DDR3
  • 500 GB HDD
  • Windows 7 64-bit OS
  • NVIDIA graphics card
  • Dual monitors from Acer

In fact, the only thing my desktop lacks is mobility, which is why I keep ending up staring at the iPad display in every electronics store I wander into and why I have been obsessively reading reviews for the Galaxy Tab, stalking my local Radio Shack until they finally put one on display.

Sure, the Tab only has a 7” display, but that means I can throw it in my bag and go, unlike the iPad, which will require a larger bag though it is easier to interact with. The iPad is established with people across the board praising it and remarking how it is changing the way children interact with electronics. As a bonus, the iPad has a larger marketplace and everything is plug and play. But do I want to support something that isn’t open source?

IP Subsystems: The Next IP Market Paradigm

The 3rd Party Semiconductor Intellectual Property (SIP) market has seen great innovation in the products it offers to System-on-a-Chip (SoC) designers over the last ten years. If any market segment in the semiconductor industry typifies the intense evolutionary pressures the entire electronics market has undergone, it is the 3rd Party SIP market.

Most of these evolutionary forces are driven by the need to integrate more functionality in fewer devices at the system level and in ever-smaller footprints. One method to accomplish this is through the use of 3rd Party SIP. However as design costs and time to market pressures mount on SoC designers, it is becoming more and more difficult for these designers to craft their silicon solutions in a timely and cost effective manner.

Enter the IP Subsystem, organized by system-level functionality and around its own internal interconnects, as one contiguous block accompanied by its own testbench of verification IP and small to large amount of applications software.

The IP Subsystem is the method SoC designers will employ to infuse the right level of complexity and functionality into their silicon solutions to meet quickly changing market requirements without experiencing a corresponding increase in design costs or design cycle time. Larger parts of the design can be dealt with at one time opening the door for the applications software to be written in parallel for each subsystem used in the design.

Semico Executive Brief: Blu-ray Players

Blu-ray has had a slow introduction and even though the “format wars” have been over for a few years now, consumers are still confused about many of the benefits of converting to Blu-ray vs. staying with DVD. The WW market will grow to ~125m units in 2014, a CAGR of 55.8%.

The Executive Briefs cycle through 33 markets per year. Our analysts look to the segments that account for >80% of semiconductors, meaning our list of markets is fluid; we’re constantly adding new high growth markets to the list.

Table of Contents: 

Save the Date: Dr. Aart de Geus of Synopsys to Speak at Semico Summit 2011

Dr. Aart de Geus
Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Synopsys

Phoenix, Arizona November 18, 2010 - Semico Research Corp. is proud to announce that Dr. Aart de Geus will speak at the Summit 2011. The Summit will be held May 1-3, 2011 at the stunning InterContinental Montelucia Resort & Spa in Paradise Valley, Arizona.

Semico Executive Brief: Blu-ray Recorders

The rate of growth for Blu-ray Recorders varies by region though Japan has had the most interest in Blu-ray Recorders due to Blu-ray first being introduced in that region, and Japan’s reliance on DVD Recorders over DVD Players. The WW market will grow to ~35m units in 2014, a CAGR of 69.4%.

The Executive Briefs cycle through 33 markets per year. Our analysts look to the segments that account for >80% of semiconductors, meaning our list of markets is fluid; we’re constantly adding new high growth markets to the list.

Table of Contents: 

3D Architectures for Semiconductor Integration and Packaging.

3-D integration and packaging is now well known to all in the semiconductor industry.  Today the focus has shifted away from trying to understand the technology opportunity to one of understanding the practical challenges of technology adoption and commercialization, including who is getting there first, how, and at what cost.  Many see 3-D integration and packaging as an industry inflexion point, not just an evolutionary change—thus there is a natural degree of uncertainty as companies scramble to secure market share, obtain new process and design tools, and of course, new customers and new applications.

IP Subsystems: the Next IP Market Paradigm

Phoenix, Arizona November 9, 2010 - As the semiconductor industry enters the second decade of the 21st Century, substantial changes to the System-on-a-Chip (SoC) design methodology are taking shape. These changes reflect issues the industry has been discussing for the last 5-6 years that are adversely affecting the SoC design effort to an ever-greater degree:

Thanks, and a Wave of My New Hand!

This article is posted on behalf of Morry Marshall, who has retired. 

This is a personal thank you to the semiconductor industry, an industry that I have worked in for almost forty years.  My thank you is for a new hand. 

In 1962 I was in a line-of-duty military accident that resulted in the amputation of my left hand.  Soon after, in Walter Reed Army Medical Center, I was fitted with a cable-operated prosthesis, the best then available.  It used a Dorrance hook opened by a cable connected to a strap looped under my opposite shoulder and closed by two powerful rubber bands. 

That type of prosthesis served my needs for many years.  I have nothing but praise for the U.S. Army and the U.S. Veterans Administration for the medical and prosthetic care I received during that time.  After more than forty years using a hook I began experiencing pain in my shoulder.  The strap under my arm had been pulling on my shoulder all the time, creating a strain, even when it was not being used to open my hook.  To lessen the pain, it was necessary to loosen the strap and use only one rubber band to close my hook.  The hook still worked, but not very well. 

Something needed to be done, Enter electronics, especially semiconductors!  I was fitted for a myoelectric prosthesis, the ETD (Electronic Terminal Device), manufactured by Motion Control, Inc., Salt Lake City, Utah. 

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