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August 2014

Medical CE will Grow 45% Between 2013 - 2017, Says Semico Research

One of the problems facing the healthcare industry today is the constant struggle to proactively engage consumers into monitoring and managing their own health before acute or chronic illness sets in.   
 
The solution can be found within the semiconductor industry. Specifically, MEMS, wireless, and cloud services are enabling a healthcare revolution where consumer medical devices will increase to 271 million units in 2017, a CAGR (2013-2017) of 45%.
 

Medical CE will Grow 45% Between 2013 - 2017, Says Semico Research

One of the problems facing the healthcare industry today is the constant struggle to proactively engage consumers into monitoring and managing their own health before acute or chronic illness sets in.   
 
The solution can be found within the semiconductor industry. Specifically, MEMS, wireless, and cloud services are enabling a healthcare revolution where consumer medical devices will increase to 271 million units in 2017, a CAGR (2013-2017) of 45%.
 

Printing Your Own Semiconductors

Much of the look and feel of today's PCs, tablets and smartphones was developed at PARC (Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center).  Is PARC now on the track of an innovation that could revolutionize semiconductor manufacturing?

With financing from DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects), PARC has developed a method of programmable electrostatic assembly, inspired by xerography.  Tiny chiplets are produced and mixed into a solution-based “ink.”  The chiplets, which have an electrical charge pattern on them, are subjected to dynamic electric fields which are used to orient and position them with micron-level accuracy.  Once assembled, the chips are put onto a final substrate with interconnects.  The technology used is similar to laser printer technology, which is essentially the assembly of large numbers of micron-sized toner particles, a Xerox development from the 1970s.    The resulting circuits can be microprocessors, memory or any other desired semiconductor chip.  Although production quantities will not be feasible for several years, could this be leading to desktop printing of almost any semiconductor?

Joanne Itow to Speak at SEMI AZ breakfast, Oct. 17

200mm: Thing of the past? Not so fast!

200mm fabs are thriving! 200mm wafer shipments to fabs in 2014 are experiencing tremendous growth compared to 2013. The challenge for 200 mm fabs in the secondary equipment market continue to be balancing quality, cost, extendibility, service and support.

Join ASML, Freescale Semiconductor, OEM Group, ON Semiconductor and Semico Research as they discuss solutions to enhance and to extend the production life of 200mm wafers:

Semico Fab Database and Update Summary First Half 2014

Semico tracks over 870 semiconductor fabs in its Fab Database.  The database includes detailed information about the fabs, including the operating status of the fab, its location, process and products, wafer size and capacity, and more.  The other document included with the database is a Word file containing a summary of updates made to fabs by company type:  Memory, Foundries, and Other.  

Table of Contents: 

Semico Identifies 75 Sensor Suppliers Targeting $28B Wearable/Mobile Market

The markets for wearable devices, smartphones and tablet PCs are large and growing quickly.  By 2018 sensor sales into mobile devices and wearables will reach $28.3 billion.  There are over 75 sensor vendors targeting these markets.  More sensors are being designed in which enable new features and functions. 

Sensors in Wearables and Mobile: The Many Players

The markets for wearable devices, smartphones and tablet PCs are large and growing quickly.  By 2018 sensor sales into mobile devices and wearables will reach $28.3 billion.  There are over 75 sensor vendors targeting these markets.  More sensors are being designed in which enable new features and functions. 

Table of Contents: 

FinFET Ramp: Changing Market Dynamics?

Rolling out a new semiconductor technology always has its share of challenges, but it seems like the 14nm finFET process node is starting off with more than its share of delays and speculation.

This week Intel revealed some of the details for its new microarchitecture, Broadwell, and their first product, the Intel Core M processor, to be manufactured using their second-generation finFET, 14nm technology.

Plagued by rumors of yield issues and a slow computing market in 2013, Intel delayed the release of their newest 14nm product line by almost one year.

Back on July 16, during the TSMC Q2 2014 financial conference call, the company reported that their 16nm finFET process would not begin ramping until 2H 2015. That is a delay of approximately six months from the original Q4 2014 ramp target.

There have been some technology issues, but Semico believes these delays are also market-driven. In the past, new products could be released for the early adopters willing to pay a premium just to get in on the higher performance. Huge volumes were not required from day one. Today, the ramp to high volume occurs much faster and the products require high efficiency and low cost to support huge consumer driven mobile markets.

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