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Semico is a semiconductor marketing & consulting research company located in Phoenix, Arizona. We offer custom consulting, portfolio packages, individual market research studies and premier industry conferences.

Graphene is a Promising Future Material for 3D Printing, Says Semico Research

Semiconductors Bring Security Muscle to IoT

Connectivity and interoperability are key elements for the IoT. The goal is to generate data from many end nodes in products and devices. These are physical objects with unique IP addresses. Consumers want products and services that will enhance and improve their lifestyles. The forecast for the number of connected devices is expected to reach 36 billion units by 2020.

Are We Going to Kiss our Cables Goodbye?

Keyssa recently announced a new wireless technology:  Kiss Connectivity.  Kiss is a point-to-point technology (as in one centimeter apart) that enables devices to transfer or stream data at 6Gb/sec, which is faster than USB 3.0 5Gb/sec speed.  Keyssa promises the transfer of entire movies in seconds.  Picture NFC on some serious steroids and you’ve got it.  The table below shows where Kiss sits on the speed spectrum compared to some other popular connectivity technologies.

Connectivity comparison.png

Some big names in the electronics industries are behind this company.  The Chairman of the Board of Keyssa is Nest’s CEO Tony Fadell.  Keyssa is backed by Intel and Samsung, among other companies. 

If Kiss takes off, it will squash TransferJet’s chances of making much of a splash in the market; it has been struggling to make headway already.  Depending on how much it costs, and the security level it brings, it may make a dent in NFC’s market as well, but NFC is really suited for enabling things like smart cards, tickets, and hotel keys where small bits of data is being transferred, so the overlap there is not as great.  Pricing has not been announced yet for Kiss.

MEMS Microphone Dominates Mobile Market, Says Semico Research

The markets for wearable devices, smartphones and tablet PCs are large and growing quickly.  By 2018 sensor sales into mobile devices and wearables will reach $28.3 billion.  There are over 75 sensor vendors targeting these markets.  More sensors are being designed in which enable new features and functions. 

 

IoT Security: At What Cost?

Connectivity and interoperability are key elements for the IoT. The goal is to generate data from many end nodes in products and devices. These are physical objects with unique IP addresses. Consumers want products and services that will enhance and improve their lifestyles. The forecast for the number of connected devices is expected to reach 36 billion units by 2020.

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870 Fabs at Your Fingertips

Jim Feldhan to Speak at SEMICON Japan on Internet of Things

Semico Research's Jim Feldhan will speak at SEMICON Japan on Thursday, December 4.  The title of his talk is "Market Dynamics Driving the Internet of Things."

Sensor Fusion and New Sensor Interface Developments Open Up Innovation

Last week at the MEMS Executive Congress in Scottsdale, Arizona (Nov. 5-7, 2014) two separate announcements were made that will have long term impact on sensors. The MEMS Industry Group announced the first open source algorithm community for sensor fusion and the MIPI Alliance introduced a new sensor interface specification.

MIPI I3C

The I2C, also known as I Squared C, standard has been used extensively for sensor interface.  Many sensor hub controllers, mostly microcontrollers, use I2C for connecting to sensors.  But I2C has its limitations in terms of power, speed and scalability. SPI is another interface standard that is used for sensors, but this requires more pins. 

MIPI is addressing the interface fragmentation and scalability issues with a new sensor interface specification, MIPI I3C. As that name implies it is backward compatible with I2C. But the new standard provides data throughput capabilities comparable to SPI. According to MIPI “the name MIPI SenseWire℠ will be used to describe the application of I3C℠ in mobile devices and the use of the I3C interface for mobile devices connecting to a set of sensors, directly or indirectly.”

This new standard has been developed because of the steadily growing proliferation of sensors in smartphones. A new standard was needed that could be scalable. MIPI has developed I3C with the participation of sensor vendors and other companies in the mobile ecosystem.

Will the Ramp of FinFET Manufacturing Capacity Shift Market Dynamics?

Semiconductors are Key to Better 3D Printing

The 3D printing world is an exciting place to be right now.  For do-it-yourselfers with an artistic or engineering bent, 3D printing delivers a whole new toolbox, enabling designs that were not possible before with exciting new materials.  These DIYers will often build their own 3D printers from scratch.  The RepRap movement was formed with the goal of creating a self-replicating manufacturing machine. 

The first self-replicating 3D printer was built in 2008 by mechanical engineers at the University of Bath. Since then, the hobbyist 3D printer movement has blossomed from a grad school project to thriving hobbyist community. A 3D printer can be built from scratch using almost any building material (plywood, laser cut acrylic, machined aluminum, LEGO bricks, etc.), however all printers need at least one type of commercially manufactured hardware: electronics. 

Example of a RepRap Printer

Source: www.reprap.org

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